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Wagner, F.H.; Br&auml;uning, A.; Homeier, J.; Spannl, S.; Volland, F. &amp; et, a. (2016): <b>Climate seasonality limits leaf carbon assimilation and wood productivity in tropical forests</b>. <i>Biogeosciences</i> <b>13</b>, 2537–2562.

Resource Description

Title: Climate seasonality limits leaf carbon assimilation and wood productivity in tropical forests
FOR816dw ID: 1484
Publication Date: 2016-04-28
License and Usage Rights: PAK 823-825 data user agreement. (www.tropicalmountainforest.org/dataagreementp3.do)
Resource Owner(s):
Individual: Fabien H. Wagner
Contact:
Individual: Achim Bräuning
Contact:
Individual: Jürgen Homeier
Contact:
Individual: Susanne Spannl
Contact:
Individual: Franziska Volland
Contact:
Individual: al et
Contact:
Abstract:
The seasonal climate drivers of the carbon cycle<br/> in tropical forests remain poorly known, although these<br/> forests account for more carbon assimilation and storage than<br/> any other terrestrial ecosystem. Based on a unique combination<br/> of seasonal pan-tropical data sets from 89 experimental<br/> sites (68 include aboveground wood productivity measurements<br/> and 35 litter productivity measurements), their associated<br/> canopy photosynthetic capacity (enhanced vegetation<br/> index, EVI) and climate, we ask how carbon assimilation<br/> and aboveground allocation are related to climate seasonality<br/> in tropical forests and how they interact in the seasonal<br/> carbon cycle. We found that canopy photosynthetic capacity<br/> seasonality responds positively to precipitation when rainfall<br/> is < 2000mm/yr (water-limited forests) and to radiation<br/> otherwise (light-limited forests). On the other hand, independent<br/> of climate limitations, wood productivity and litterfall<br/> are driven by seasonal variation in precipitation and<br/> evapotranspiration, respectively. Consequently, light-limited<br/> forests present an asynchronism between canopy photosynthetic<br/> capacity and wood productivity. First-order control by<br/> precipitation likely indicates a decrease in tropical forest productivity in a drier climate in water-limited forest, and in current light-limited forest with future rainfall < 2000mm/yr.
Keywords:
| climate | tree growth | litterfall |
Literature type specific fields:
ARTICLE
Journal: Biogeosciences
Volume: 13
Page Range: 2537–2562
Metadata Provider:
Individual: Jürgen Homeier
Contact:
Online Distribution:
Download File: http://www.lcrs.de/publications.do?citid=1484


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