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Niemann, H.; Matthias, I.; Michalzik, B. &amp; Behling, H. (2015): <b>Late Holocene human impact and environmental change inferred from a multi-proxy lake sediment record in the Loja region, southeastern Ecuador</b>. <i>Quaternary Internation</i> <b>308-309</b>(308), 253.

Resource Description

Title: Late Holocene human impact and environmental change inferred from a multi-proxy lake sediment record in the Loja region, southeastern Ecuador
FOR816dw ID: 1373
Publication Date: 2015-03-13
License and Usage Rights: PAK 823-825 data user agreement. (www.tropicalmountainforest.org/dataagreementp3.do)
Resource Owner(s):
Individual: Holger Niemann
Contact:
Individual: Isabelle Matthias
Contact:
Individual: Beate Michalzik
Contact:
Individual: Hermann Behling
Contact:
Abstract:
Late Holocene human impact and environmental changes were reconstructed from a sediment core of the Laguna Daniel Alvarez (2200 m asl) located on the outskirts of the city of Loja, southeastern Ecuador. Palaeoenvironmental changes were investigated by pollen, spore, algae and charcoal analysis in com- bination with X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning and element analysis of d13C, Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Total Nitrogen (TN) and radiocarbon dating. This multi-proxy study provides in detail the set- tlement history in the inner-Andean dry valley in southern Ecuador over the last ca. 1400 years.<br/> Between 630 and 1470 AD, Zea mays was intensively cultivated around the studied lake by the native Palta culture in the Loja region. After ca. 1470 AD, Z. mays cultivation collapsed, accompanied by an increase in fallow vegetation, such as Mimosa and Poaceae, probably as a result of the Inca invasion and occupation from 1463 to 1531 AD in southern Ecuador. After ca. 1570 AD, Amaranthaceae/Chenopo- diaceae markedly increased, re?ecting the beginning of the Spanish Conquest. In 1531 AD, Loja became Spanish and, during the ?rst ca. 100 years of the Spanish regime, Loja developed into the forti?ed capital of the province. In the 17th century, crop growing strongly declined due to the diminished indigenous population that probably suffered from new diseases introduced by the Spanish invaders. Pinus and Eucalyptus as well as Plantago lanceolata were introduced in the Loja region about 220 years ago.
Keywords:
| palynology | human disturbance | Palaeoecology | vegetation history |
Literature type specific fields:
ARTICLE
Journal: Quaternary Internation
Volume: 308-309
Issue: 308
Page Range: 253
Publisher: 264
Metadata Provider:
Individual: Hermann Behling
Contact:
Online Distribution:
Download File: http://www.lcrs.de/publications.do?citid=1373


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