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Werner, F.A. &amp; Homeier, J. (2014): <b>Is tropical montane forest heterogeneity promoted by a resource-driven feedback cycle? Evidence from nutrient relations, herbivory and litter decomposition along a topographical gradient</b>. <i>Functional Ecology</i> <b>x</b>(x), x.

Resource Description

Title: Is tropical montane forest heterogeneity promoted by a resource-driven feedback cycle? Evidence from nutrient relations, herbivory and litter decomposition along a topographical gradient
FOR816dw ID: 1288
Publication Date: 2014-11-07
License and Usage Rights: PAK 823-825 data user agreement. (www.tropicalmountainforest.org/dataagreementp3.do)
Resource Owner(s):
Individual: Florian A. Werner
Contact:
Individual: Jürgen Homeier
Contact:
Abstract:
1. Ridges of tropical mountains often differ strikingly from neighbouring ravines in terms of<br/> forest structure, productivity and species composition. This heterogeneity is poorly understood<br/> despite its critical role in biodiversity maintenance, carbon and nutrient budgets.<br/> 2. We examined measures of tree biomass and productivity, foliage and litter quality (nutrient<br/> concentrations, specific leaf mass, phenolics), herbivory and leaf litter decomposition in each<br/> six plots laid out in upper and lower slope position in a tropical montane moist forest in southeastern<br/> Ecuador.<br/> 3. Productivity, quality of foliage and litter as well as herbivory were significantly lower in<br/> upper slope position, and closely correlated with soil nutrient concentrations and accumulated<br/> humus. The decomposition of upper slope leaf litter (decomposition rate k) was substantially<br/> lower than in litter from lower slope forest, whereas the site of decomposition (slope position)<br/> only had a marginal effect on the decomposition rate.<br/> 4. Our results suggest that the differences in stand structure, productivity, foliar quality, herbivory<br/> and decomposition between slope positions are ultimately due to stronger nutrient limitations<br/> in upper slope forest. We propose a general conceptual model that explains origin and<br/> maintenance of contrasting forest types along topographical gradients through down-slope<br/> fluxes of nutrients and water, and a nutrient-driven positive feedback cycle.
Keywords:
| topographic heterogenity |
Literature type specific fields:
ARTICLE
Journal: Functional Ecology
Volume: x
Issue: x
Page Range: x
Metadata Provider:
Individual: Jürgen Homeier
Contact:
Online Distribution:
Download File: http://www.lcrs.de/publications.do?citid=1288


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