Download
Cite as:
Rehmus, A.; Bigalke, M.; Valerezo, C.; Mora Castillo, J.R. &amp; Wilcke, W. (2014): <b>Aluminum toxicity to tropical montane forest tree seedlings in southern Ecuador: response of biomass and plant morphology to elevated Al concentrations</b>. <i>Plant and Soil</i> <b>382</b>(1-2), 301–315.

Resource Description

Title: Aluminum toxicity to tropical montane forest tree seedlings in southern Ecuador: response of biomass and plant morphology to elevated Al concentrations
FOR816dw ID: 1273
Publication Date: 2014-06-06
License and Usage Rights: PAK 823-825 data user agreement. (www.tropicalmountainforest.org/dataagreementp3.do)
Resource Owner(s):
Individual: Agnes Rehmus
Contact:
Individual: Moritz Bigalke
Contact:
Individual: Carlos Valerezo
Contact:
Individual: Julio Renato Mora Castillo
Contact:
Individual: Wolfgang Wilcke
Contact:
Abstract:
Aims: In acid tropical forest soils (pH <5.5)increased mobility of aluminum might limit aboveground productivity. Therefore, we evaluated Al phytotoxicity of three native tree species of tropical montane<br/> forests in southern Ecuador.<br/> Methods: An hydroponic dose-response experiment was conducted. Seedlings of Cedrela odorata L., Heliocarpus americanus L., and Tabebuia chrysantha(Jacq.) G. Nicholson were treated with 0, 300, 600, 1200, and 2400 ?M Al and an organic layer leachate. Dose-response curves were generated for root and shoot morphologic properties to determine effective concentrations (EC).<br/> Results: Shoot biomass and healthy leaf area decreased by 44 % to 83 % at 2400 ?M Al, root biomass did<br/> not respond (C. odorata), declined by 51 % (H. americanus), or was stimulated at low Al concentrations<br/> of 300 ?M (T. chrysantha). EC10 (i.e. reduction 10 %) values of Al for total biomass were 315 ?M<br/> (C. odorata), 219 ?M (H. americanus), and 368 ?M (T. chrysantha). Helicarpus americanus, a fast growing<br/> pioneer tree species, was most sensitive to Al toxicity. Negative effects were strongest if plants grew<br/> in organic layer leachate, indicating limitation of plant growth by nutrient scarcity rather than Al toxicity.<br/> Conclusions: Al toxicity occurred at Al concentrations<br/> far above those in native organic layer leachate.
Keywords:
| aluminum toxicity | tropical tree seedlings | dose-response curves | organic layer leachate |
Literature type specific fields:
ARTICLE
Journal: Plant and Soil
Volume: 382
Issue: 1-2
Page Range: 301–315
Publisher: Springer
Publication Place: Dordrecht
ISSN: 0032-079X
Metadata Provider:
Individual: Wolfgang Wilcke
Contact:
Online Distribution:
Download File: http://www.lcrs.de/publications.do?citid=1273


Quick search

  • Publications:
  • Datasets: